Nature Frenzy

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uwaah:

Jewel Caterpillar (Acraga coa) - family Dalceridae

Photo take in a mangrove area, found this stunning translucent caterpillar laying on a Red Mangrove tree leaf this morning early. about 3 cm long.

(photos/text: Gerardo Aizpuru)

* here is a picture of the adult moth:

http://www.whatsthatbug.com/2008/10/28/unknown-mexican-moth/

(via bumblingfoodie)

thedailywhat:

Heartbreaking Tearjerker of the Day: A 17-day-old ear-less bunny named Til, who was expected to become Germany’s next celebrity animal a la Knut the polar bear and Paul the Psychic Octopus, died tragically this week when he was accidentally stepped on by a TV cameraman.

“No one could have foreseen this,” said Uwe Dempewolf, director of the zoo in Limbach-Oberfrohna where Til was set to be unveiled in a special press conference. “Everyone here is upset. The cameraman was distraught.”

Speaking with the German newspaper Bild, the cameraman said Til was hiding under some hay, which is why he didn’t see him. Dempewolf offered that at least the bunny didn’t suffer, as the cameraman’s misstep was “a direct hit.”

Zoo officials are now considering having Til stuffed so that he may be able to enjoy in death the fame he never got to know in life.

[telegraph / spiegel.]

It’s the Octopus Week at the Seattle Aquarium from today until Feb. 26.

Here are some fun facts on the sea giant:

(from Seattle Aquarium’s blog)

Scientific name: Enteroctopus dofleini
What do you call more than one octopus? Although many believe the correct plural form of octopus is octopi, it’s actually octopuses.

Weight: Octopuses average 60 pounds, but they can weigh up to 150 – with an arm span of up to 20 feet across! It’s no wonder they’re the largest species of octopus in the world.

Life span: 3-5 years. At the Aquarium, we keep our octopuses for 6-12 months before releasing them back into Puget Sound to complete their life cycle and reproduce.

Growth rate: Octopuses gain 1-2 % of their body weight every day. That’s the equivalent of the average human gaining 2-4 pounds a day!

Boneless with a beak? Giant Pacific octopuses have no bones but they do have a beak, much like a parrot’s. This lack of bones allows them to fit in and through incredibly tight spaces, but their beaks put limits on that. In general, if they can fit their beaks through something, they can squeeze the rest of their bodies through as well.

Enrichment at the Seattle Aquarium: We’ve created a variety of activities, called enrichments, to help keep our resident octopuses healthy and happy. For instance, we do food puzzles to help bring out their natural behaviors and keep them mentally stimulated. We put food inside jars, pill bottles, ice toys – even Mr. Potato Head – and let them figure out how to retrieve it. We also do live food enrichment with their favorite foods, Dungeness crab and live clams.

I don’t know how I missed this:
No where to be found in the wild since 2004, but Columbia Basin pygmy rabbits have been reintroduced to the wildlife area in June 2011 after zoologists tried to bred them on Oregon Zoo and the Washington State University.
These rabbits are the world’s smallest and among the rarest.  Native only to Columbia Basin in Washington State, they usually weighs less than a pound in adulthood.
For more information, go here.

I don’t know how I missed this:

No where to be found in the wild since 2004, but Columbia Basin pygmy rabbits have been reintroduced to the wildlife area in June 2011 after zoologists tried to bred them on Oregon Zoo and the Washington State University.

These rabbits are the world’s smallest and among the rarest.  Native only to Columbia Basin in Washington State, they usually weighs less than a pound in adulthood.

For more information, go here.

dailyotter:

Thanks, blinddeadmcjones!

HAPPY HALLOWEEN everyone!

Fun fact about sea otters:

- Notice the high buoyancy of their bodies, sea otters sometimes hold paws to prevent from drifting apart.

(via dailyotter)

Dead Siberian tiger found in NE China

(Edited from China Daily) The carcass of a Siberian tiger has been discovered in a village in Northeast China’s Heilongjiang province Thursday, people.com.cn reported.

The big cat, roughly 2.5 meters in length and 200 kilograms in weight, was found dead by a reservoir in Fusheng village, Fuyuan county of Mishan city in the province.

The cause of death remains unknown. Wildlife experts are on their way at the site.

Reports say the tiger was first spotted alive on Oct 17. Another witness claims it was reportedly seen swimming in the reservoir.

The tiger is thought to be wild and the first time once has been seen in the village. There are also no Siberian tiger reserves in the area.

The number of wild Siberian tigers is extremely rare. No more than 400 of the species live in the world, most of which in Russian, with less than 20 in China.

Humpback whales sleep gracefully, side by side, upside down, in the crystal clear water.
Oceans, Disneynature

Red pandas are originally from cool temperate bamboo forests in the Himalayas, Myanmar, and the Sichuan and Yunnan provinces in China. Sharing the name of giant pandas but resembling raccoons, they eat bamboo leaves and small fruit. Their average lifespan is about 15 to 17 years. Though protected in some preserves, the population of red pandas is still declining due to human activities such as deforestation and increased agriculture and cattle grazing. 

To read my news article on red pandas

Photo: red panda at Woodland Park Zoo, WA

The Lions Mane Jellyfish is the largest jellyfish in the world. They have been swimming in arctic waters since before the dinosaurs (over 650 million years ago) and are among some of the oldest surviving species in the world.

The largest can come in at about 6 meters and has tentacles over 50 meters long. Pretty amazing when you think these things have been swimming around for so long.

They have hundreds of poisonous tentacles that it used to catch passing by fish. it then slowly drags in it’s prey and eats it. 

That is terrifying. 

(via theweekmagazine)

Ayers Rock, Australia.

This giant rock, which the native people called “Uluru”, rests in the middle of the desert acting as a water storage, creating an oasis around it. 

Image source:world heritages